‘Britain seems broken now’: faces from the Brexit exodus to Europe

(James Higginson) #1
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(anon54681821) #2

i love the line “rather than isolating themselves in the traditional expat enclaves, many are keen to embrace the local communities in their host countries.”

and " a Brexit refugee"

(Jane Williamson) #3

I find it totally amazing that the Remainers don’t give a damn about any other Brits and the problems they have caused.
I can totally understand the Civil War now.
I am so glad that we moved to France as I couldn’t live in UK now.

(Dominic Best) #4

I’d presumed that you yourself were a remainer.

(anon54681821) #5

I do not follow this part? a minority of people on both sides of the fence dont care about it and how it affects the others. Both sides voted on false info that was spread by both sides. The Remainers (the folks who wanted to stay) do care about it as they see it as a big mistake and as I voted to stay part of the EU I care and worry what this will do to and for the UK. I hope it works for the country and those who voted to leave. Britain has for me been broken for a very long time, long before brexit and for 23 years I wanted to leave the Uk the only thing that ever held me back was doubt and my job which I loved. (I say 23 but we left 5 years ago so it was only 18 years but its 23 years ago now) It was my first visit oversees that let me see a different side of the world.

(anon71231711) #6

“we said to the agent in Portugal: ‘We’re leaving, we’re on our way, you need to find us something.’”
Yep, sounds like a well-planned move, taking total control of their own futures.

It’s probably not pc to say so but Vishal Vora doesn’t strike me as a typically British name; and out of that bunch, I would bet on his move being the one that works out best. I don’t know whether those two observations are connected or not.

(Paul Flinders) #7

I’m a bit confused by your comments - it doesn’t seem odd that people who would rather the UK stay in the EU would feel strongly enough to put their money where their mouths are, so to speak.

I’ve considered it myself but, sadly, it just wouldn’t work for us at present.

Also - I’m not clear, is it the Remainers or Leavers that you think are causing problems and why?

(anon54681821) #8

without reading again hes Australian and shes English. their kids are English also.

to note my friend who are 4th generation in England their surname is Khan it does not make them any less English that me or anyone else for that matter

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(anon54681821) #9

also I do believe you have mis quoted it, which was done to you in the past if i remember correctly. Full part represents a different picture

"“We lost £50,000 overnight,” Barber says. “When we went to bed, the pound was quite high because everyone forecast that we were staying in, and when we woke up it had gone through the floor.”

Even worse, a week later and the day before they were to fly out to Portugal, the owner of the house the couple were buying found out they were from the UK and put the price up beyond their means.

“So that house fell through and we said to the agent in Portugal: ‘We’re leaving, we’re on our way, you need to find us something.’ So he found us two schist stone houses, which are in a stunning location – better than the first one.”

(Paul Flinders) #10

To split hairs slightly Brexit did not cost them a single £ - I am quite sure that they had the same bank balance when they woke up on 24 June 2016 as they had when they went to bed on the 23rd

OK, fair enough - the number of € they were going to get per £ would have been less - but they could have mitigated by moving money before the vote, perhaps they were banking on the £ rising, though it was already pretty high (it opened about 1.30€ to the £ on the 23rd) so that wasn’t so likely. It had fallen about 9% (to 1.20€ to the €) by the end of the month.

Currency fluctuates, if a 9% movement will wreck your plans then there might not be enough margin in those plans - but there are all sorts of ways to protect yourself against market movements close to a deal.

It sounds like it turned out OK for them - in fact distinctly to their advantage, if they wound up with a property which was more to their taste.

(anon54681821) #11

so 10 cents on the pound loss. £500,000.00 would have been 650,000.00 € but was in effect this much. 600,000.00 € so a diference of -50,000.00 €

so its very easy to loose 50 grand in a 10 cents overnight exchange rate.

its important to read all the lines together not just one part.

Not the first time ive heard and read of people lost thousands on money transfer after a house sale.

(Dominic Best) #12

Paul is correct they will have lost no pounds because of the Brexit result. What they lost out on was the number of euros that those pounds would have bought.

(anon54681821) #13

please stick to what James asked you to do. thanks

(anon54681821) #14

so yes what they probably meant was they lost 50 grand in euros by loss in exchange rate. the story reading it a few times is quite badly written and several grammar mistakes.

the risks we run by waiting for things. but had they done it the day before and the rate went up they would have lost too. its a calculated risk they took and lost.

(Dominic Best) #15

Pardon? I don’t understand your reply. Surely I am allowed to agree with Paul? What have I missed?

(anon54681821) #16

referring back to a private convo with me you and James. i shall refrain from saying more. either way i wont reply further

(Dominic Best) #17

So I’m barred from agreeing with another member when that other member disagrees with your point of view? I think not. Anyway I see that you did see the error in your argument. No pounds were lost.

(anon54681821) #18

im pretty sure I used the euro sign in my comment. Now the original document which I did not wrote they say pounds.

I also stated there are many typos in the original document and the £ instead of € may well be another of them.

Please do point our where I as an individual said they lost 50 grand in pounds and not where im quoting the original document.

(Dominic Best) #19

Harry, my comment, the one that made you throw your toys out of the cot was referring to the fact that they claimed that they had lost £50,000. I was just agreeing with Paul when he said that they lost no pounds. Why you are making a mountain out of a molehill is beyond me.

(James Higginson) #20

I recall asking you two to keep clear of eachother @anon54681821 @sax

Can you do that please?

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