Medical Care in France after B-Day

brexit

(David Martin) #61

What would be against the law? I really don’t understand your reply to my previous post.

I wrote that mutuelles don’t take pre existing conditions into account.
The OP stated that she had heard the opposite.
I replied that I was sure that they don’t take pre existing conditions into account.
You replied that you didn’t agree with me, then argued that in your case they hadn’t taken pre existing conditions into account. (confirming what I wrote)

I think you must have misread my posts.


(Jane Jones) #62

Going back a step ot two in this thread, what the OP needs to look into is the first three months healthcare.

Once you have lived in france for three months in a regular and stable fashion you can apply to join the health service. And once you have joined you can then get the complementary mutualle cover, although with prostate problems you may not need to fret about this as your medical treatment could well be covered 100%.

However some people seem to be asked to confirm that they have healthcover during the period before joining the french health service. Ie for those first three months. And several people have talked about having had to take out private health insurance for this period, which has cost them a bit.


(Graham Lees) #63

In other words, they ignored them…


(David Martin) #64

As I said they would in my posts. Why did you write that I was mistaken?
You misread my original post why don’t you just admit it instead of muddying the water?


(Graham Lees) #65

Sorry David, I had eye surgery and still have difficulty reading whilst the eye heals properly.
If I caused you great distress and alarm I sincerely apologise and will huddle in the corner of the garden and self flagellate for 10 minutes if you think it will help.


(David Martin) #66

I just don’t understand why you insisted in posting that my post was incorrect when it was giving exactly the same information as you posted later. It just confuses the issue and the OP was already confused.


(Graham Lees) #67

Oh FFS!!
I apologised, I told you why I misread it it so why can’t you just move on?


(David Martin) #68

Sorry, I didn’t realise it was an apology, I read it as sarcasm.


(Angela Grzywacz) #69

So to clarify
Once I have been in the French system for three months I will be able to apply for inclusion in the French health care system
The period before this happens ( three months) do I need to get private health cover and if so how much would I expect to pay .
Thanks
Angela


(stella wood) #70

It is standard procedure to have in place Medical Health Cover… when coming to France. Some folk are not asked to show that they have it… but many more will be… so you can make up your own mind.

@fabien is the person to contact … he can give you some idea of costs… which will depend on your own situation and requirements.

c heers


(Anna Watson) #71

It might help clarify the timescale to bear in mind that any foreigner, EU and non EU alike, is allowed to spend up to 3 months in France as a non-working visitor. But obviously France doesn’t want visitors applying to join the French healthcare system. So the logical solution is to discount the first 3 months for non-working visitors. After that, those who stay beyond 3 months can no longer class themselves as visitors, so it’s presumed that they intend to become resident (otherwise they should have gone home), so if they meet the conditions then they can join “the system” and the state will open their rights.
Different for workers of course, because they enter “the system” straight away.


(Fabien Pelissier) #72

Exactly as @Anna and @smwsplr said. 3 months as a “tourist” and then you can apply for full residency status and benefits (including the French Social Security). Important to bear in mind in regard to the Brexit => We don’t know if it’s going to be an hard ball negotiation or if we’ll have some kind of reciprocal agreement, if that’s the hard ball option, the UK will be considered as any non EU country and therefore visa + carte de séjour will become mandatory for anyone that’s not a French citizen and therefore private medical cover will be mandatory (up until you’re allowed into the French SS). I’m not saying that to sell some policies but mostly because the medical cover is way cheaper when done before arriving in France (less than 500€ for 12 months cover if taken before arriving vs at least 1800€ per year when you’re already around). Considering anything can happen, it might be a good idea to consider being insured right now instead of waiting for the verdict as it might become much more costly (not mentioning the extra costs charges by the French SS itself).


(Jane Williamson) #73

Why would you need a visa as well as a Carte de Sejour?


(Jane Jones) #74

That’s what people from non EU countries have to get now, and a likely scenario would be that UK people would be treated just the same. So a visa before you arrive, and then have to apply for a non EU carte de sejour when you are here.


(Anna Watson) #75

If you’re already here and in a position to apply for a CdS you won’t need a visa. Having a visa means that you’ve been vetted by the French consulate in your own country and you meet the initial immigration criteria, so you will be allowed into France and you can start the process with the immigration office OFII (normally they require immigrants to go on an integration course to learn about French customs and some basic French), start your CdS application etc.

Immigration is a different ball game from exercising freedom of movement but it has positive points too, in that it makes you think about what’s involved in moving countries, it gives you guidance when you arrive, and it stops folk coming here with no proper plan and struggling to survive France.