Moving to France post Brexit?

That is not how immigration works though.
It is easier to immigrate to France than the uk but not at all the same as having freedom of movement.

I did mention freedom of moving

Morning all, first post so HI! One idea or suggestion we heard offered in order to achieve residency status without buying a property was to take a long term rental on a property for at least 12mths, but you or a family member would have to travel and live in it, and you will need a utility bill in your name paid from a french bank account before the 31st Dec.

Buying/owning a property before the 31st Dec doesn’t change anything or give you any rights, being a resident here is what does :wink:

We know a Brit couple who are currently in France looking for a permanent home, I know that a rental contract is suffice to prove residency by the 31st of December but will a Compromis de Vente also be accepted if the sale can’t complete by that date?

@tim17 Presumably the Brit couple will still be renting here, while they continue with their purchase… ???

A compromis will back up their intentions, but I reckon it will be the Rental Agreement which is the more important… after all… Sale/Purchase can fall through…

what else are they doing… to show residency… ??

They are staying in a gite so technically no rental contract as such, I’m not sure they’ve got a Scooby about what is required to be honest.

No, because it’s residency, not property ownership that counts, as for staying in a gîte, better get themselves a rental contract. imo a gîte is holiday accommodation (not permanant/resident) :wink:

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Perhaps I should have made myself clearer, they have sold up in the UK so are currently homeless and intend to be French resident by the end of the year.

OK, but I repeat what I said, cheapest and easiest would be to rent a house, get the utilities in their names and “get resident” :wink:

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Andrew is right, a gite rental is not enough, needs to be a long term retal agreement for a sole property, 12mths min was suggested.

Exactly right, you need to actually be there. :slight_smile:

If you haven’t been away more than a year it isn’t an issue (if you can prove your previous residency). Probably safest to have hubby arrive this year regardless to be sure. This then gives you and the kids the right to join him under the WA in the future. Here is the information in the WA:
14. Those who have not yet resided continuously and lawfully for five years in
their host state by the end of the transition period will also be able to stay until
they have reached the five year threshold, at which point they will qualify for
the right to reside permanently. Until this five year threshold has been met,
continuity of residence in the host state will be broken by a period or periods
of more than six months in total in any 12-month period. One absence lasting
a maximum of 12 consecutive months for an important reason, such as
pregnancy and childbirth, serious illness, study, vocational training or a
posting abroad is permitted. The Withdrawal Agreement enables the host
state to restrict these rights if the individual is a serious or persistent criminal,
or if they seek to abuse or defraud the system.
From:

It could be sent in as a 2nd document together with the papers below.

They are fine as long as they are here. There is provision for staying in a gite under this clause:
In case of accommodation with a third party: certificate from the host, dated and signed, copy of the host’s identity card or passport or residence permit, and proof of the host’s address if the address on his/her identity card, passport or residence permit is outdated.
This is directly from the gov flowchart:
https://accueil.contacts-demarches.interieur.gouv.fr/media/uploads/2020/10/15/tableau_cas_d_usages_brexit_v5_07092020_en.pdf
The ‘certificate’ that they refer to is the government attestation that can be found here:

Really not required - see above!

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Is it even allowed for gite owners to rent out their gite out during confinement? I thought it was not. Apologies if this has been answere d and I failed to see it.

Glad there’s an expert in the house for those concerned! :wink:

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My understanding is that normal gite operation (holidays and short breaks) is suspended, but ‘contrats longue durée’ continue as normal.

My understanding is that not only do you need to have a residence (rented or owned) but also have the S1 form from NHS overseas healthcare services.
Then the Carte de Sejour and Carte Vitale can be applied for and tell the local tax office you need to be on their system.
You only need to spend 6 months in any (financial?) year in France, so there is some flexibility there if you need to return to UK.
Im not sure what constitues “essential” travel under the new lockdown rules but gives a good reason if you can’t get there by 31st Dec I would have thought.

Last news I had through from the authorities is that they aren’t giving any flexibility on the 31/12 date.

We are not required to close our gîte, and can rent out to people with a professional attestation (eg the teams of workers roaming the country installing fibre). However new holiday makers have no attestation so couldn’t get here. But I’ve heard of one couple who were in a gîte last week and decided rather than leave they would just sit out the confinement where they are which is allowed as long as they stick to the normal rules.

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S1 is only for people in receipt of a UK state pension or cross-border workers. It’s perfectly possible to move here with private health i surance.

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