Pensions ...the variations


(Barbara Deane) #81

Ask Anna.


(David Martin) #82

My neighbour and I often car share for activities when they are outside our local town. Our doctor retired recently and the best replacement is a fair drive from us. We decided that that was OK because if either of us was not feeling up to driving to an appointment the other could help out. If either of us is going to one of the nearby larger towns 50km away we always check to see if the other person wants to take advantage of the journey. I’m really pleased about these arrangements as it gives me confidence that the neighbors and their families will be there to offer support as I grow older. I love the friendliness of my neighborhood, my daughter bought a flat in a converted Edwardian house in south London and after three years she doesn’t know any of her neighbours despite them all sharing the same main entrance. I feel so lucky to live in this sort of environment.


(Barbara Deane) #83

And we too are taken to Bordeaux by our friends in the village.
They have been extreemly kind and friendly and I am so happy
that we have these sort of people to share things with.
We have outings with friends and we collect them or they collext us and we
go out somewhere
But we still need our car.


(anon71231711) #84

Well, I was following on directly from Barbara’s question “So what happens if you need to go to the dentisrt, doctor or somewhere where you need to be taken…what do you do in those cases?” because in fact, that quite often turns out to be the reason that people are hitching, because the only appointment they could get was at a time that doesn’t fit in conveniently with the bus times.


(Barbara Deane) #85

Getting silly now.


(Timothy Cole) #86

You don’t say.


(jane butler) #87

Yes why not? I have had a hard time in France
after doing property in England, a perpetual mover
and bringing up 3 children with no support on the
proceeds (which was hard enough in England
believe me.)

However France was something else, really bad
work usually, difficulty finding people who were not out
to con you and quite a lot of petty theft along the way
from those around who one trusted, cleaners and the like.

After 25 years I feel I have won through and won a
bit of respect at last. I have built up a holiday rental
business wth an income I declare of between
35,000 and 40.000 euros. I have virtually no UK
pension (£43 a week) and I am 70 and still working hard.
By the way I do mix with "French"people!

Jane


(jane butler) #88

Well I’m sorry Anna but I have found I am entitled to
nothing in France and I have asked incessantly for 25
years… I think I’m the only person in the Gironde who
had to pay for school lunches for my son and the school bus.
There’s always some reason… you are “proprietaire” or…?
Maybe I haven’t got the right approach!

Jane

Message du 10/01/18 14:40
De : "Anna Watson"
A : jane.butler@wanadoo.fr
Copie à :
Objet : [Survive France] [General Discussion] Pensions …the variations

Anna Anna Watson

January 10

Barbara_Deane:
In France it is around 15.000 pounds and UK 7,500.

This site explains what the basic state pension in France is for low earners:

La retraite en clair

Minimum vieillesse, allocation de solidarité aux personnes âgées (ASPA) et…
Maternité, maladie, chômage… : notre système permet d’ouvrir des droits pour la retraite même quand on ne cotise pas.

and it’s about the same as the basic state pension in the UK.
“Le minimum contributif bénéficie aux assurés ayant cotisé sur de faibles revenus, et remplissant les conditions d’une retraite à taux plein, c’est-à-dire :
avoir atteint l’âge minimum de la retraite (62 ans à partir de la génération née en 1955, entre 60 et 62 pour les générations précédentes) et avoir validé le nombre requis de trimestres (entre 160 et 172).
ou avoir dépassé l’âge de la retraite à taux plein ( 67 ans à partir de la génération née en 1955, entre 65 et 67 ans pour les générations précédentes).
Le minimum contributif est composé de deux parties :
le minimum proprement dit (629,62 € en 2017 pour une carrière complète) ;
et la majoration, lorsque vous justifiez d’une durée d’assurance d’au moins 120 trimestres au régime général, qui porte le minimum à 688 € (toujours en 2017).
Ces montants n’ont pas été revalorisés depuis le 1er octobre 2015.”

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In Reply To

jane butler

January 10

I’m sorry Stella but you seem to be living in a different France to me and I’ve been here for 25 years…sharing a car! indeed? I think Barbara makes some very valid points and its a shame you have to argue about every single one in rather a smug and patronising way. It IS interesting to compare …


(jane butler) #89

Actually I live in the Medoc and I am the only person
I know who actually pays tax, and for that matter one of
the very few who works… maybe I live in a deprived area?

Message du 10/01/18 14:36
De : "Ann Coe"
A : jane.butler@wanadoo.fr
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Objet : [Survive France] [General Discussion] Pensions …the variations

Misty36140 Ann Coe

January 10

As an immigrant to France, one who has lived here for many years, I have often shared cars with locals.
Could you define who all these people are receiving state aide and for what ?
I don’t understand either your reference to a club which expats ( awful word ) are unlikely to be invited to join. In my experience if you are friendly and welcoming to others and participate in local events then you are usually made welcome and invited to all sorts of events in return.

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In Reply To

jane butler

January 10

I’m sorry Stella but you seem to be living in a different France to me and I’ve been here for 25 years…sharing a car! indeed? I think Barbara makes some very valid points and its a shame you have to argue about every single one in rather a smug and patronising way. It IS interesting to compare …


(stella wood) #90

Hi Everyone… I’m Back… !!!

Back from an unexpected trip to hospital to sit for 4 hrs in A&E with the family of a chap who was taken ill… and how did I do that…???

Received SMS from the family in A&E Then a friend called (they’d had an SMS…too…) asking if I want to get to the hospital to sit with ****. Yes, Please :hugs::hugs:.

Phew finally got back home just after 8.30pm… That is how friendship and neighbourliness work… especially important in times of crisis. and No, I’m not being smug… I’m saying how things do work here… how do they work where you live??? mmm… that could well be totally different.


(Véronique Langlands) #91

The Médoc IS a deprived area, the majority of employed people are unskilled agricultural workers, which is the most deprived category, socio-economically. Hard to believe when you see the wine chateaux and tourist places but it is… and Entre-deux-mers isn’t far behind.


(Barbara Deane) #92

I really do not know too much about Medoc…have not been there for ages.
Every one here in 33890 seem have the basics…the car, the TV and food,
wood for the fire and the roofer, the electricians and the plumber seem to be
working really hard and making a decent living. I know some of them and a friend is
a roofer, He gets a great holiday every year and is a happy man with a head for high spots.
Yes the chateaux are amazing and produce …possibly the greatest wines in France.
Stella how dramatic!
What are you trying to proove.
How did you get to the hospital…by the way?


(Véronique Langlands) #93

I think there is a lot of unnoticed rural deprivation and that you are very unlikely to see it unless you are confronted with it for one reason or another.


(Barbara Deane) #94

Apart from Guard Larose, St Esteph and co and a few restaurants etc
the Medoc is bleak in appearance a wildreness of Forrest.But Entre-deux-mers
is such a pretty region.
Remembering old conversations regarding the airport at Bergerac…always busy
and the 936 leading towards it there are new buisness buildings popping up like
wild flowers…lots of them.
The restaurant where we ate today was absolutely packed…on the other side of the
936 near Casyilon La Bataille.
Maybe these poor people hide away in dark little homes but I never see them.


(jane butler) #95

Message du 10/01/18 21:10
De : "Véronique Langlands"
A : jane.butler@wanadoo.fr
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Objet : [Survive France] [General Discussion] Pensions …the variations

vero Véronique Langlands Team

January 10

The Médoc IS a deprived area, the majority of employed people are unskilled agricultural workers, which is the most deprived category, socio-economically. Hard to believe when you see the wine chateaux and tourist places but it is… and Entre-deux-mers isn’t far behind.

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In Reply To

jane butler

January 10

Actually I live in the Medoc and I am the only person I know who actually pays tax, and for that matter one of the very few who works… maybe I live in a deprived area? Message du 10/01/18 14:36 De : “Ann Coe” A : jane.butler@wanadoo.fr Copie à : Objet : [Survive France] [General Discussion]…


(jane butler) #96

Absolutely right… I hardly know anyone who works here
except in the vines,
but 15 minutes away is Chateau Lafitte Rothschild
and another 300 chateaux who double their income
every year. Jane


(Barbara Deane) #97

And just across my parkland grow the grapes for the 2nd wine of Laffite
Rothchild…the hunters charge across the land and my cats play and sleep
between the vine lines.Life is far from perfect…but I would not go back.


(Véronique Langlands) #98

Unless you are in contact on a daily basis with a wide cross-section of families then you won’t have a clue, Barbara. I’m afraid you are precisely the sort of person who won’t see rural deprivation as it really is because nobody will mention it to you - you are foreign and will be seen as privileged, running your own business as it suits you, in relative isolation and catering for a luxury mainly foreign market.

So really nothing in common with the sort of families, maybe only a few hundred metres away from you, whose children we have boarding free of charge because that way we know they are safe, fed and decently housed.


(Barbara Deane) #99

I am foreign and not privIiledged! I am someone who is working longer than
most French women!
catering for the luxury end of the market…no upper middle.
Providing clients for the locals. My clients use the bars,the pharmacies and buy
the wine which grows close to my land.
My money fed artisans, bricos and the notaire and local agent did pretty well.
I did this to be in a lovely area and carry on doing the work I love.


(Véronique Langlands) #100

The people I am thinking of won’t benefit from the Barbara-generated largesse coming the way of the businesses you mention, there is no knock-on effect for them, they haven’t got the sort of job you would notice, in fact most of the time they don’t have jobs at all. They are under the radar. They have less in common with the notaire & co. than you do.

ps " SEEN as privileged" read what I said! :blush: