Swimming Pool Cover

Who knows Carl, where will I be in a year or two? I have travelled quite a lot but another trip is always welcome.

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Slated covers on outdoor pools do this. As I said before you really need a winter cover and definitely not one of those mesh covers. That’s what you need, can’t say it any other way. You don’t have to wait until winter to use it, any time you are not using the pool.

This could be a good addition to your slatted pool cover. Never actually seen or tried it but I saw it at a trade show some time ago and kept the leaflet for just such an occasion.
https://www.piscine-center.net/bache-nova-plus-ecran-d-hivernage-pour-volet.html

Just wondering if folk ever think of the armadillo type covers for pools. Friends way down south have a lowish one, which keeps the pool clean since they have woodlands all around. also, it protects us wimps (me) from the wind. All is possible, fully open/fully closed and everything in between. They swim all year round.

Others, in our nearest town, have a full height one (more like a room) which acts as a sun-lounge and is amazing in winter.

Thanks guys for all your advice. I think it is clear that I need a second type of cover.

I was thinking that I might try and recover my bar cover from the pool shop, as they kindly took it away (without asking) when they installed the cover. I think that if I remove the second bar and replace this with the end bar that has the roller fitted onto second place I will then be left with a flap of canvas that I can cut to go around the posts for the slatted cover. This just then leaves me with the issue of the fabric straps that attach the cover to the roller. I seem to think they detach, but how easily…hmmm. I will need to investigate.

John, thank you for the link. I will look into this as it could be really good. The only issue I foresee is that that there is nowhere for rainwater to go. Won’t it just form a pool on top of the pool so to speak and then push down the cover?

Thank you Stella. I think this is probably the end goal to fit an Abri so that we can use our pool all year round. But, this is more of a long term project as I understand they cost upwards of 20,000€ . For that type outlay I better spend less time in the pool and more time at work to fund it :joy::rofl::joy:

Our neighbours have an abri and last time we were chatting about pools Madame said pools are a lot of work and I know they had an algae problem early on this summer.
In my very short experience I don’t think there is any substitute for proper pool maintenance on a daily basis. We also never leave our cover off when going out, even for an hour as farmers turn up at unpredictable times to whirl their crops around.
I was also surprised, David, that grass blew into your pool. This has never happened to us, is your grass very close to the pool or are you in a windy spot?

Stella that’s an abri in France.

You should have an overflow in the skimmer but very few pool builders make use of this facility.
Alternatively there are cover pumps.

I have always maintained, it doesn’t have to be that way. I try to educate owners into managing their pools and it gets really easy then.

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Ha ha… John… Yes, I know if I were to buy one here I would need to use the full description … :zipper_mouth_face:

I’ve an abri in my garden, but it’s stone and houses all the bits and bobs and a freezer… my neighbour has a wooden abri to store his logs, another has an abri for his pool pump etc… :joy::rofl::upside_down_face:

I used the word armadillo so folk would immediately know what I was talking about. :slightly_smiling_face::slightly_smiling_face::slightly_smiling_face:

We have an electric cover and we have floats that keep it from freezing onto the water in the water.
It takes about two days to get the pool clear again when we start it up again in the, used to be end of April, but it it is now more like mid May and I didn’t swim until the first of June.
Although the pool is heated by a heat pump, it can be so cold at night that it is not worth heating until the warmer nights arrive.

That is the sort I have, it is excellent. We can swim from the end of April until the end of October

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We installed a new pool, put in a Bio-UV system and a roller cover - and part way through the first season, we started to get green in the pool. I then decided it would be a good idea to read the instruction manuals for both bits of kit. BOTH said when the temperature gets over 28 degrees, you must run the pool pump 24/7. Of course the people who had installed it had given me the advice they normally give for pools in terms of how long to run your pump - so suggest you read your instructions very carefully. This could be the reason for your problems.

The second season we did exactly as the instructions said, and have had a perfect pool all year round now for 3 seasons. As winter approaches, and when the pool gets down below 15 degrees C, we clean, chlor shock, and add the winter treatment - that keeps it right through the winter. A few leaves and bits get down the sides of the cover, but we have situated the pool well away from trees, so not that many.

A quick manual clean at the beginning of summer soon fixes what is there, and a gentle kartcher to the pool cover gets that looking pretty good.

Hope this is of help…

Sandra, what sanitiser do you use with your UV system?

I stick with the BioUV products, so at the beginning of the season, Filter Clean to make sure sand filter in good order, Chlore Shock to the pool and Algicide. Then a daily dose of Oxygen Ramenant. This is very low, and akin to the chlorine that gets put into your drinking water. I also backwash for at least 3 minutes every week, and make sure that skimmer baskets are super-clean by removing them and washing them in the house.

Automatic pool cleaner does the rest, and I just swim…

Makes for a really lovely pool. Extremely pleased with it.

Interesting what you say about the green, the issue for us is that we have a green water line, the water itself is crystal clear. However, when I test the water (admittedly with dip strips) it says there is next to no chlorine. The pool shop assure us this is normal with salt water systems and that if you want a reading you have to take it directly from in front of the return jets?? I have no idea if this is correct. Stabiliser also seems low to me. I think I will get a proper test kit and see where things really are. I need to find out what the free chlorine should be in saltwater.

No it’s absolute bullsh1t
Chlorine should be exactly the same as another Chlorine pool.
Make sure new test kit can measure CYA stabiliser, the most important chemical in the pool

Until you get a test kit take a sample of your pool water, note down water temperature, to a pool shop.
They should test it for free and give you a printout.
Thank them and if you have any concerns ask John Withall, don’t let the pool shop advise you.

I thought about whether to post my thoughts on this without wishing to cause offence to Sandra. I decided to do so as others reading this may believe Bio-UV is the way to go.
Sandra has a great regime, starting with a thorough cleaning of the filter and a chlore choc.
I personally wouldn’t bother with the algaecide and I haven’t got the MSDS on Oxygen remanent to know exactly what’s in it, could be peroxymonopersulphate or hydrogen peroxide, both popular non chlorine oxidisers. My money would be on monopersulphate as that can work with chlorine and is not effected by the sun’s UV degredation. Then weekly backwash.
Personally I belive that regime would work perfectly without the UV.
Indeed the Bio-UV website goes to great lengths to decribe how the pool water “The water is disinfected and disinfecting, to prevent the appearance of algae and avoid excess dosing.”

" Bacteria, viruses and algae are subjected to the UV-C chlorine-free treatment : UV-C lamp radiation are destroying them, without causing any side effects or creating any harmful by-products.

“Choosing UV-C treatment for your swimming pool or spa water, means choosing an effective and entirely automatic disinfecting solution. No more manual treatment of swimming pool water. The system adapts to the previously installed equipment and is easy to maintain, saving you money and ensuring optimal bathing comfort.”
Note this is marketing material, no more manual dosing? Sandra?
Saving you money? their chems are more expensive and running the average pool 24 hours is more expensive and not all pumps are specified for continous running. (my pool costs less to run for 24 hours than a conventional pool costs in 2 hours)

As I posted in another thread after 4 turnovers of your water filters around 98% of the water, 5 turnovers, 99% of the water so 24 hour filtering would allow most of the water to travel through the UV chamber. I don’t have UV but I do filter for 24/7 and my pool doesn’t go green with just a little chlorine in it 0.2-0.5ppm keeping the water moving mixes the sanitiser and filters your water and that is the job done.

UV is usually more benficial for indoor pools to breakdown the chloramines (that’s the pool smell and eye irritating compounds) UV could help in a heavy batherload pool and although rare should crypto etc occur, UV can crack their shell but they can also survive this low dose of UV. It’s the swimming pool industries dirty little secret that low presure UV can actually damage the cell causing the bacteria or virus to multiply through the wish to preserve their life/offspring. There is also the time the bacteria etc is exposed to the UV, too quick and it just hurts them! Medium pressure commercial UV is different, nothing survives that!

Nothing wrong in what Sandra is doing but companies seldom tell the whole truth or any truth in some cases. There should always be an active sanitiser in the pool as UV, Ozone etc only work when the system is running. I have contacted Bio-UV for the chemical MSDS documents to see what is actually being added to the pool.

Hi John,

No worries, no offence taken! When we did the renovations here, and built this new pool, I went to our supplier to order all the bits for a salt system, and they said ‘why are you not using Bio-UV Mme Shadrach’ and I said ‘’Cos I have never heard of it.’ He said that they had several clients who were extremely happy with this system, so he thought he should mention it to me. They have no real preference either way - they were going to sell me some kit whatever we decided. As they have been extremely good and knowledgable suppliers of a lot of kitchen, bathroom and plumbing materials etc, I went off to investigate.

We came to the conclusion that this saved lugging bags of salt around, and it was an easy decision to reverse if we made a mistake, so we went for it.

I love the fact there is no chlorine. I have annoyingly sensitive skin, and it does not really like chlorine, so this pool suits me down to the ground. It is also lovely for children who spend more time under the water than on top, as their eyes don’t sting. No silly effect on dyed hair either!

You are quite right in pointing out that it is not inexpensive. We do spend quite a lot of money on chemicals, but buy in bulk at the beginning of the season and get decent discounts. Automatic dosing also makes sure the right amount is used, rather than ‘chucking some in’ a bit at random.

I do feel that the algicide is a good idea - after all, you only treat the water that goes through the UV tubes, you do NOT treat the water actually IN the pool. So, with a hubby like mine that gets his strimmer out and cuts the grass not very far from the pool edge, then gets his blower going and blows it away from the pool (well, most of the time…) we do get grass in there, even if he thinks we don’t. Also frogs, hedgehogs, swallows, guide dog puppy in training, and bats have all decided to share the pool with us at one time or another, so I feel that the algicide helps ensure that the basin itself does not suffer and go green. I don’t base this statement on any science, just that I have an enviable permanent pristine clear pool now in its 4th season, so don’t plan to change anything. This is not expensive, and I only put it in at the beginning of the season when it is not turning for 24 hours. We only put it onto that when it reaches 27 degrees.

Overall, my take on pools (this is the 8th pool we have had the pleasure of looking after in the last 30 years, in the UK, Dubai and France, so we are not new to this game) is that nothing beats good regular weekly maintenance, and keeping the chemical levels correct, whatever chemicals they may be! I appreciate that if the pool is in a second home, and you spend limited time there, this can be difficult - and may have to call on the services of a good pool maintenance company to help when you are absent.

I can send you a photo of the labels on the product if Bio-UV don’t respond….


John Withall

    August 16

SandraFrance:
I stick with the BioUV products, so at the beginning of the season, Filter Clean to make sure sand filter in good order, Chlore Shock to the pool and Algicide. Then a daily dose of Oxygen Ramenant. This is very low, and akin to the chlorine that gets put into your drinking water. I also backwash for at least 3 minutes every week, and make sure that skimmer baskets are super-clean by removing them and washing them in the house.

Automatic pool cleaner does the rest, and I just swim…

Makes for a really lovely pool. Extremely pleased with it.

I thought about whether to post my thoughts on this without wishing to cause offence to Sandra. I decided to do so as others reading this may believe Bio-UV is the way to go.
Sandra has a great regime, starting with a thorough cleaning of the filter and a chlore choc.
I personally wouldn’t bother with the algaecide and I haven’t got the MSDS on Oxygen remanent to know exactly what’s in it, could be peroxymonopersulphate or hydrogen peroxide, both popular non chlorine oxidisers. My money would be on monopersulphate as that can work with chlorine and is not effected by the sun’s UV degredation. Then weekly backwash.
Personally I belive that regime would work perfectly without the UV.
Indeed the Bio-UV website goes to great lengths to decribe how the pool water “The water is disinfected and disinfecting, to prevent the appearance of algae and avoid excess dosing.”

" Bacteria, viruses and algae are subjected to the UV-C chlorine-free treatment : UV-C lamp radiation are destroying them, without causing any side effects or creating any harmful by-products.

“Choosing UV-C treatment for your swimming pool or spa water, means choosing an effective and entirely automatic disinfecting solution. No more manual treatment of swimming pool water. The system adapts to the previously installed equipment and is easy to maintain, saving you money and ensuring optimal bathing comfort.”
Note this is marketing material, no more manual dosing? Sandra?
Saving you money? their chems are more expensive and running the average pool 24 hours is more expensive and not all pumps are specified for continous running. (my pool costs less to run for 24 hours than a conventional pool costs in 2 hours)

As I posted in another thread after 4 turnovers of your water filters around 98% of the water, 5 turnovers, 99% of the water so 24 hour filtering would allow most of the water to travel through the UV chamber. I don’t have UV but I do filter for 24/7 and my pool doesn’t go green with just a little chlorine in it 0.2-0.5ppm keeping the water moving mixes the sanitiser and filters your water and that is the job done.

UV is usually more benficial for indoor pools to breakdown the chloramines (that’s the pool smell and eye irritating compounds) UV could help in a heavy batherload pool and although rare should crypto etc occur, UV can crack their shell but they can also survive this low dose of UV. It’s the swimming pool industries dirty little secret that low presure UV can actually damage the cell causing the bacteria or virus to multiply through the wish to preserve their life/offspring. There is also the time the bacteria etc is exposed to the UV, too quick and it just hurts them! Medium pressure commercial UV is different, nothing survives that!

Nothing wrong in what Sandra is doing but companies seldom tell the whole truth or any truth in some cases. There should always be an active sanitiser in the pool as UV, Ozone etc only work when the system is running. I have contacted Bio-UV for the chemical MSDS documents to see what is actually being added to the pool.