What do you NOT miss about the states?


(Holly Hill Mangin) #1

I saw this question posted but it was aimed at the UK members of the group. I'm curious about us American members. What is it that you DON'T miss about the states? I was going to start off but for the life of me can't think of anything at the present moment. Perhaps I'm being nostalgic? Anyway, let me know. I know I don't want to move back (and I won't) but can't think of why not!


(Kirsten Monteil) #2

My in-laws live in a semi-rural community and come from a farming background, (at least my father-in-law). I have seen him indiscriminately kill some insects by smashing them. I know that might not seem like a big deal, but even the smallest creatures don't deserve to die when they're just plotting along in their daily life. I never forgot what I saw and I practiced what I'd say if I saw him about to do it again. Fortunately I never saw him do it again.

It use to be like that in the U.S. too, and not very long ago. Still there are atrocities happening to animals all over the world. Groups like PETA investigate and bring them to justice one step at a time. But what can we do at a grass-roots level? Be safe though, we can't always say something to an individual, but I plan to speak out when I can. Your comment made me think about this issue for the future. What would I say to a stranger? The French don't seem to have a problem voicing THEIR opinions, why should we? When in Rome......


(Nicole Simms) #3

Couldn't agree more with the gun comments, I hate that about America and it appears to have become a more serious problem in recent years.

We live in rural France and hunting is in our face literally which I hate as well. I know it isn't about what we don't like about France but that and animal neglect/cruelty I find very difficult to live with here. :(

By the way, so nice to see some fellow Americans posting on a French forum. :)


(James Kearney 2) #4

Susan, like you my wife and I have lived in France for over 20 years and we don't miss anything in the US. We love France, with it's great and not so great aspects but the former greatly outweighs the latter. We have good friends who are our Neighbors. The French people are very polite contrary to the image of the "rude" French one sees mentioned in the ignorant American media.


(catherine nordeng) #5

Hear hear Dennelle (well maybe except for the sports fanaticism thing...where WILL I watch the Green Bay Packers in France?~)!


(Kirsten Monteil) #6

Great point Mary, wish we had a 'like' button like on fb :) Hear that James H?


(Kirsten Monteil) #7

Isn't it interesting that people who don't take time to proofread and edit their text spend a lot of time afterward backpedalling, explaining, and apologizing, actually I don't think you apologized for anything. Only offered justification of your points.


(Kirsten Monteil) #8

Great Link Catherine! I bookmarked it under 'Health' France isn't even on the charts, hmmmm, food for thought. As I am weighing pros and cons between France and the U.S. I hadn't even thought of that! Just one more HUGE reason to get outa the U.S.!


(Kirsten Monteil) #9

Excellent point Susan :)


(Kirsten Monteil) #10

True this is a discussion of what do you NOT miss about the States, not 'what does France have/have not that the States has/has not.

I'm trying to find what I WOULD miss about the States if we move to France. I agree with Kim, and I think she is very polite when she makes her point. It seems the French actually TRY to offend as they're making their point. Is it that they don't they feel there is merit enough in their idea, so they have to rip you a new one? That way the other is reeling from being shocked at such insolence that they aren't easily able to assess what the former is saying. It takes self control and respect for others to debate as adults and not children in the schoolyard, are the French lacking in those areas, do you represent a typical French person in your style of debate Katherine? Forewarned is forearmed as they say in my country. I'll be ready for that when we move there.

There is NO perfect land, even between cities in the same country one would come across pros and cons. The city in which I live differs greatly to where I work.

As for the topic in question, I would NOT miss:

1. All that gun shit, pardon my language but it IS appropriate in this case.

2. People so interested in looking young, they pay lots of $$ to look like creepy aliens from another planet, such superficiality!

3. Speaking of superficiality the government cares only about looking omnipotent and not humanitarian, hence policies/lack of social programs for the sick and aged. Althewhile shouting 'We are number one!' Maybe 100 years ago, dream on U.S.

4. The lack of separation of Church and State, even though paradoxically our country was founded by pilgrims escaping religious persecution. In the U.S. atheists are being vilified and attacked daily!

5. Again, superficiality strikes when people are all smiles and hugs, (behaving as friends), but these 'friends' have limits of acquaintances. I've finally learned to have a wait and see attitude with people, still being disappointed in some, but not surprised, (thankfully I have managed to make some true American friends)

6. Children who are given driver's licenses and the ease of getting said license, meanwhile STUPID AND UNNECESSARY accidents continue, while they drive around without auto insurance! Why are they not arrested for committing crimes?!

7. So many damn people/traffic/congestion

I WILL miss:

1. Air conditioning everywhere

2. Ease of getting a car towed when necessary

3. Smoke free zones, although I think they take it a bit too far in the U.S.

4. Trader Joe's, (deserves it's own line here). So great!

5. Ross, Marshals, TJ Max, (actually lots of inexpensive and easily attainable products)

Synopsis:

Everything I will miss are all superficial things, not human things. The only exception being respect for others while we debate, (even a sensitive), subjects.


(Kirsten Monteil) #11

The PSA steals stuff too! I had a bunch of stuff that I bought in Morocco, then we went to France, I know I had it there, then to the US and when I got home these trinkets were missing! I know the French wouldn't have done it, those trinkets could easily be found in France cheaply. I didn't even try to do anything about it, they have no oversight on these people, I knew there was nothing to be done. Arggggh!


(Chant Sutton) #12

I do not miss the many crimes there.

The speedy way of life

The pollution

And all the "Do not laws"


(Shauna Jenkins Tomlin) #13

I don’t miss:

-Getting in my car and driving for everything I need.

-drivers who don’t respect pedestrians and bicyclists and the lack of sidewalks and bike lanes and public transport, I have had biker and runner friends in serious accidents

-materialism, More is more attitude.

-Family time comes second, not by choice by necessity.

Management in business not as family issue oriented

-Christmas items out in August, Easter in January, materialistic over the top holiday decorations

-Fast food restaurants, fast food! All the food poisoning reports.

-Drunk drunk people at public events, they cant manage their alcohol

-poor school systems and the busses who stop and drop kids off every 20 feet

-Safety and security and fear. I have a very nice home in a nice area in the US. I have to keep doors locked day and night.

-cutting grass and the stress of being surrounded by perfect ocd neighbors with perfect manicured lawns

-mass development pushing wildlife out and the tear it down and rebuild, then tear it down again and rebuild

-Medical, sign 10 documents for your 15 minutes appointment.

-Driving while texting, eating, shaving, brushing teeth and putting on makeup oh yes reading. and the numerous accidents and fatalities from these distractions (this may be a Louisville,Kentucky issue as we have the stupidest drivers god ever put on the face of the earth)

-my target and tjmax addiction, being in France avoids 12 step program

-Walmart And Kroger, avoid at all costs.

-and don’t even get me started on politics :[ sad sad


(Kim - Your full name (required) please!) #14

Very well said, Dennelle!


(Dennelle TAYLOR NIZOUX) #15

don't miss: the feeling that someone could shoot me or my loved ones at any time in any place; the polarization of belief systems (political, religious, etc.) and impossibility of open, respectful discussions; factory-farmed food; the wasteful and short-sighted view of ecological concerns; the effing commericals; ignorance of other cultures; the dumbing down of everything (as if intelligence was uncool); sports fanaticism; pop culture fanaticism; people smiling and pretending to have it all together when they're popping antidepressants like tic tacs; the outrageous cost of those pills and everything else healthcare-related; but mostly that feeling that the only point to life is to consume more/better/faster.


(Holly Hill Mangin) #16

This is true; I no longer have all of the microwavable food that I used to eat (but I have to admit that I DO miss some of them!!)


(Holly Hill Mangin) #17

I totally understand this and I've only been gone for 5 years. When I go "home" for vacations, things have already changed dramatically since I lived there. Yes, many things are cosmetic (a new highway, more restaurants, actual roundpoints--which didn't exist where I lived), but some things are more than cosmetic. And some things are just feelings that can't be voiced because they are a culmination of a lot of little and big things that have just built up to the point of being "enough is enough".


(Kim - Your full name (required) please!) #18

Hi, Gillian - thanks for the positive & friendly compliment, but that certainly doesn't mean that everyone has our heads in the sand. And yes, there are issues everywhere. Bon weekend!


(Trish Roberts) #19

Exciting to know there's an 'American' group. I like other anlgophones too, but almost never meet fellow US-citizens here.

I agree with the above stated: the inability to realize that guns do, in fact, account for so many deaths. . .and for that matter lack of health care. And the inability of having anything resembling a polite political discussion.

In France no one will accuse you of being a 'marxist-fascist' for supporting healthcare or gun control or the separation of religion and school curriculum. (I have actually been called that so no sense telling me it doesn't mean anything--the person administering the title was/is unaware of this fact)

Also, being from Southern California, I don't miss the huge horrible expanses of big box stores strung all over the freeway in the desert between and throughout cities. I also don't like that shopping malls/centers (even more attractive ones) often replace downtown areas.

And the relatively poor quality of food (even though if you do look hard you can sign up for a CSA or get local organics).


(Mary Brighton) #20

Violence. The rest I tolerate as part of the culture-just like I do living in France.