Alternative Living Commune

It’s been reviewed by @james

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I live in a village a bit smaller than yours. We have a successful alternative community of about 20 people here. They share accommodation, cook and eat together, run guest accommodation, produce bread and vegetables etc. They don’t affect the community at all but they’re not integrated either. BUT the founder is a psychotherapist by profession, she interviews anyone who wants to stay there and there are strict criteria. She set up the community having visited many alternative communities and noted the problems. No drugs or alcohol are allowed (some residents are in recovery) , and residents must do some kind of paid work as well as work on the house, gardens etc. They have daily meetings and any problems are thrashed out. There is separate accommodation for anyone who is, temporarily, having difficulties with the group or the ethos. It works well through having a clear vision and agreed rules. But I think you’re looking at something very different.

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Hi Patricia, can you please share where you live? After living in US for 22 years and working in a corporate full of stress world, I really want to live a simple life, to be a part of nature and the community who cares about each other, do not pollute the surroundings, don’t go after the money no matter how it affects others and the list goes on. I guess I became a non-traditionalist in our not so kind society. Thanks!

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Hi Olga - there are lots of alternative communities all over the world. The best place to start researching them in France is probably the Oasis co-operative of communities -


There are many other networks.
I have an old friend that lives in the intentional community at Canon Frome Court in the UK - and absolutely loves it - you have your own living space but also lots of communal meals, activities, etc…
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Geof,
I’m ordering the trilogy, I need a new book as the Yoo doctrine (Torture Memos) is incredibly depressing. :slight_smile:
There’s been a lot written on globalization in the past 16 years, and while it’s old, Kingsnorth’s book at least seems read-able.
When you really think about it, aren’t we all disillusioned drop-outs to some extent? Might be just wishful thinking on my part.
I fought City Hall, finally obtained an absentee ballot for the election and voted despite what I perceived to be a well-orchestrated effort to suppress my Constitutional right, but even as I was doing so, I thought what difference does voting really make in our convoluted two-party system where nothing substantial is ever accomplished? Yes, I loathe Trump and the people who support him and would rather see Biden and Harris sitting in the White House, but honestly, what difference will it really make in a country with longstanding traditions of oppression, colonization, hierarchies? It was built solely on oppression and slavery. The established myths must be perpetuated to sustain the country and regardless of who “wins” on November 3rd, there can be no substantial change.

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If the Democrats gain possession of both Houses and start to bring in substantial change, which is really necessary, there is sure to be a response from all those who can look no further than their own backyard, many of whom seem willing to take up arms.
What a scenario.

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Good for them, but sounds horrible to me in its regimentation! I’m far too rebellious and uncooperative.
While I haven’t done a complete 180 on the subject, I’d say I’m at about 175.

Nah, it will still be more of the same regime, just hiding under a new cover.

Sorry this was removed, hidden, but at least not deleted. Your post was not offensive or insulting to me in the slightest. I love all the new terms I’m learning here!

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I’ve stayed at and known a fair few communes and got to know the people and they can be very different so, without knowing what your incomers are like, it’s hard to say. I’d recommend that you go and talk to them, but please, try to shelve any pre-judgement and polarity. They may be a positive influence in these times when we badly need to ease away from our capitalist structures.
New-age/hippy folk are not necessarily bad news - some are really lovely people.

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Patricia, I liked reading James Coleman “Committee 300” on globalization and who runs this world (apparently, it is the queen of England, who owns 80% of world’s islands, Australia, Canada, South Africa, New Zealand, rules USA and now she wants Russia to complete the list that is why news agencies put Russia in a bad light, so when times come the war is supported by the brainwashed citizens).

How exciting - you must let me know your thoughts (perhaps by message - I’m not sure many will be interested in a conversation about Wesker).
But don’t get me started on American politics…

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Yes of course, of course, and she is a giant shapeshifting lizard too.
Elizardbeth II - there’s a clue in the name. Taps nose and rolls eyes significatively.

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A perfect example of a gammon is Tim Martin boss of Wetherspoons.

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You are a Californian ex-hippie living in a small village. Maybe you seem or seemed as exotic and strange and non-traditional to the long term residents, before they got to know you, as this group of newcomers do to you? Generalising wildly most expats don’t live a “traditional” village way of life in France.

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