A question


(Barbara Deane) #1

I met up with some friends recently who live in another region and


we talked about his sisters questions.


His sisters husband works in UK and taxes paid there.....but they


have a home in France and she would like to come here to live and


do some kind of work with the AE system.



They would live in France most of the time. He would continue working


part of the year in UK.


How much does she have to work....Pay in cotistations to participate with AE and to obtain


a carte vitale?




(Barbara Deane) #2

Thanks Julia.

I hope that the B AND B is doing well.


(Julia Grange) #3

Technically, you don't have to earn anything as an AE, although after 2 years of showing no income you would be thrown out of the system. There is no minimum income requirement, although there is a maximum turnover (which is variable depending on what business she does), after which you have to change regime. So when I started out, I did B&B on a limited basis and I think I earned around 500€ on which I declared and paid my social charges. But even with nil turnover, say in your first year, you can still get the carte vitale as a permanent resident, even if it seems to take forever in some areas!


(Barbara Deane) #4

They are married....I believe...

So as he has paid tax in UK on his earnings....He will have to declare

it here but not pay tax on it? Is that correct Veronique?


(Véronique Langlands) #5

Remember a married or pacsed couple is taxed as a unit in France so that may well raise additional problems. In other words I don't think the constituent halves of a married couple can have different domicile/residence & tax status, if she is deemed resident or domiciled in France he may well be too.


(Barbara Deane) #6

I will pass on the info...thanks


(Gary Walton) #7

The number of months is immaterial if you are an auto-entrepreneur. If you pay into the social security system of France, you are entitled to a carte vitale. The problem is actually getting one. I've been here 2 and half years and still haven't got one. However, if you keep all your medical invoices and receipts you will eventually get most of the money back.

Unlike the UK, most of your contributions to the French state go on social security contributions with income tax being lower. His status vis-a-vis the French health system is a separate issue.


(Barbara Deane) #8

Yes thanks but will she be covered with a carte gris if she works just a few months

per year? Her husband will only be taxed once....on his UK income?


(Gary Walton) #9

Hi

It's around 23% depending on which activity.