Be careful if swimming in natural freshwater, when levels are low

Be aware that pollution levels rise as water levels go down. Some areas have seen bathing banned for various reasons.

Having read this article - I reckon Nose-clips might well be advisable as a precaution, whatever and wherever in the world - :zipper_mouth_face:

Not a risk if the pool is properly chlorinated. Natural pools may have a risk factor but most if not all cases are in the USA

Hi John… must admit I was horrified when I read the headline in my Sud Ouest.

As the articles say, swimming pools etc, where some sort of chemical disinfectant is used, are NOT considered a risk.

In the last 50 years there have been 310 cases of which 145 were in the US so it’s not rife - but it should not be simply dismissed. With Climate Change all sorts of other changes might well occur…

This particular “nasty” is most of a risk when the air temperature is high and the freshwater levels are low… which is happening all over the world in streams and lakes and especially with naturally-heated pools of freshwater. Cases are rare but have happened

Folk do travel far and wide - and being aware of the risk (however small) is no bad thing - so before plunging in, in some foreign clime (etc etc) simply put a peg on your nose. :wink::rofl::hugs:

The press just love to find new things to frighten us with as it fills column inches. Deaths over the last 50 years from aspirin?

:sweat_smile::joy: Perhaps this is a ruse to enhance the sales of nose-pegs :thinking::sunglasses::smile::smile::smile:

A nose-peg does for a crocodile what parsley does for fish…


My daughter ‘snapped’ this on the shores of Lake Kariba earlier this week…she wasn’t ‘snapped’ herself

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Blue Algae is the problem here at the moment in the UK. and we have had warnings in place not to swim or allow dogs to swim in affected waters. It is particularly toxic to dogs and can be fatal. It can cause vomiting and diarrhoea to humans. Here’s a link if anyone’s interested with a photo of how to recognise it. https://www.bluecross.org.uk/pet-advice/blue-green-algae-and-its-dangers-dogs

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Reporting is one thing but we should be asking what is being done about it. Large committees of people doing nothing is the usual behaviour with a free lunch at the end.
I met with a company today who can clean up these ponds and lakes.

Hi John… does the Company advertise in France ?? Does it make its presence felt - 'cos I’m sure folk would like to get these “dangerous” sites cleaned up if they can…:thinking: although France is awash with lakes and etangs… :roll_eyes:

Yes a pan European multinational Company

well, let’s hope they are listened to by those folk who make the decisions :thinking:

:sweat_smile::rofl::joy::upside_down_face: yeah right

I would strongly advise against swimming in any unsupervised water. You can have no information about water purity, depth, currents or underwater hazards. You not only put yourself at risk, but also endanger anyone who attempts to save you. There were several incidents of drowning in the UK during the recent heat wave. It may look cool and refreshing, but open water bathing without local knowledge is fraught with unseen dangers.
And finally, never swim to rescue a dog. Be assured that if your dog can’t survive, neither can you. There a number of recorded cases of people drowning while trying to save their pets when the dog has walked out of the water a mile down the beach. If you can find someone with a boat or a jet ski, they might be able to help. Otherwise just wait with a dry towel and pray that he makes it.

Latest: Two more young swimmers drowned off Clacton.

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