Not yet resident, "dazed & confused" need clear sequential "To do List'


(Hilary Jane Dunk) #1

Hello all,


I am at the point where I need to start doing something about progressing to living over here in France on a full time basis.


I have obviously, been consulting the discussions on this site and I obviously have some considerable homework to do. I have regular income from an early retirement compensation scheme, that I pay tax on in the UK. I have a house here that needs a fair amount of improvement and I need to generate a bit more income to help with this. I have plans to make good use of the space that I have here when that is done. I'm working on improving my website - I'm a Fine Artist/unemployed teacher of Art & Design and have a certificate & some experience teaching EFL.


I've been reading the discussions relating to registering with CPAM/starting a micro entreprise etc., and I would like to find a couple of days a week (max) EFL work (I'm working on developing the Art side of things, to take it down a more seriously commercial route) - and I have health problems, which means I have to pace myself and I tire easily, so I'm not able to work full time.


I have taken the trouble to copy & paste some relevant discussions, to begin to sort out a plan of action in terms of a sequence of what I should do , what takes priority. I would be grateful if anyone has any books/articles/pamplets that they would recommend and (as I am a visual learner,) has anyone come across a useful, clear, flowchart that I can follow ?


Thanks, in advance,


Hilary. (Pres de Bergerac)



(Jane Williamson) #2

Hi Hilary, you register with CPAM if you are in receipt of a state retirement pension and a form S1.

Otherwise it will be whichever provider covers your particular status.

There is a march in Paris of 50,000 people against the RSI.

I think an action plan is an excellent idea, especially as you are an early retiree and will need to provide for your own health care, unless you become employed/self employed.

Good luck. It can be a minefield.


(Brian Milne) #3

Hmmmm, a plan of action. 'The best-laid schemes o' mice an' men Gang aft agley' to quote our Scots bard Burns. A flowchart is an excellent idea but allow yourself to have some diversions and extra spaces. We had a 95% clear transition and everything since, including getting our AE status respectively, carte vitale and so on. However, as you see, other people have had quite the reverse. So, we must assume, there is no actual standard story to follow. The order of things, as per a flowchart, is not necessarily the way it works out. Deciding on micro enterprise versus auto entrepreneur and getting at least the private part of health cover are your absolute priorities, the rest fall in place as they come usually.

We had to work instantly and although I arrived believing I was as fit as though I was 20 years younger, two years in I was proven wrong and then had a string of serious problems. I am absolutely certain that those are the priority and than goodness we did them straight away, the health insurance immediately. During the first week here I believe.

The other thing is whether you can cope linguistically. I have a feeling you have French but the bureaucratise sometimes near on did for me. I have the fortune of my OH having studied in Francophone Switzerland, so despite her Italian accent the people we had to deal with capitulated to her whereas when there was any potential stumbling block without her I would not have had such an easy ride through. As to whether you work part time of full, that is of no concern to the powers that be. If you work then that is that. For a couple of years I have actually only declared on one quarter for the social payments, not having worked more. So that is for you and not for them, indeed do not even bother to tell them unless asked.

I too live near Bergerac. There is a Bergerac group. We have not met for some time but I suggest you join and some time when you are here some of us try to meet. If and when I can help, if only talking through things, then ask. Véro Langlands lives very close to where 'Bergerac people' have met in the past and should she be available, I am sure she would offer the same. Therefore I suggest you put up a message on the Bergerac group saying similar to here.

Ask direct questions as you go along. You will get a variety of replies, as you have seen already, but somewhere in the pile there will always be the good apple to pull out of the rotten ones.


(Sheila Walshe-Blackmore) #4

Hi Hilary Jane. I too wished Is had a flow chart, but we muddled through and are coming up to our fourth year here in France. There are a couple of discussions of old on this subject, and there may be a nugget or two there for you in amongst all the comments.

Here's one: http://www.survivefrance.com/forum/topics/moving-to-france-things-you?x=1&id=3339392%3ATopic%3A63151&page=1#comments

And another: http://www.survivefrance.com/profiles/blogs/ten-things-i-wish-id-known

Good luck!