Problems with Cats

We have just taken on 2 lovely rescue cats who are indoor cats. This means cat litter. Does anyone know the approved method of disposing of soiled litter in France ?

What kind are you using just now.

Great question.

Along with Colin’s question, I would ask three other things: do you compost? Do you have a flower garden? And thirdly, how close are your neighbors?

I’ve checked Calitom, which is the local organization for trash and recycling in my area. They don’t have an ‘approved’ method but some disposal methods (that you’ve most likely already crossed off) won’t work. For example, soiled litter wouldn’t of course go in the yellow recycle bags (which are for packaging recycling).

Cat urine is not recommended to be used in compost for vegetable gardens. This isn’t a French more a general knowledge sort of thing, so if you garden you may well be aware of this already.

I’m suspecting that perhaps your request for an ‘approved method’ of disposing cat litter might be a more complex one.

Cheers to you for adopting the cats, and best of luck!

We use wood pellets meant for heating in our cat litter trays - it is cheap am works well - scoop out the poop a z put in the dustbin, the rest goes on the compost pile.

1 Like

Same for us, wood pellets are cheap compared to anything ‘animal specific’ and easy to dispose of.

We use ziflora disinfectant on our spoil and compost it as composting biodegradable cat litter should always be done with real caution because of the risks of potential pathogens which can be found in cats that eat birds and rodents.
The cats can become infected when they eat birds or rodents which are infected with Toxoplasma gondii .
This parasite can cause toxoplasmosis which can be fatal to infants and adults with deficient immune systems, and you can catch it from cleaning the litter box and not washing your hands afterward. Therefore, when composting the litter, always wear gloves and wash your hands thoroughly when finished and keep the composting heap away from veg patches.

Isn’t it the same as it is for dog waste? Both are carnivores although I admit that dogs tend to have a less wild diet.

I was advised at the dechetterie many years ago that dog waste should be bagged and put in the general waste for the lorry to collect.

I collect ours every day in a bucket with a trowel (specific to the job) and then when that is full it goes into a large black bag in a large lidded container in the garden, and when that is full it goes down the hill to the wheely. :grinning:

1 Like

Just to clarify, when I say “we use” the wood pellets, I mean the cats do…

Just in case anyone was in doubt!

4 Likes

A timely warning Mary, the dog I have in foster at the moment does not eat faeces, cat or dog, thank goodness. He is cat unfriendly but, because of his chasse genes tends to howl at almost any living thing so cats have plenty of warning and are long gone before he reaches them. But this means that they know, if they are alert, that they can roam in the garden safely and quite often I collect cat droppings as well as his own. I always wash my hands immediately after this daily chore. :wink:

We seem to live in a really upside down world don’t we…???

My three collies are raw fed…two of them descending from raw fed mothers and none of them have ever shown any desire to eat faeces…(rolling in random “interesting” spots is a different matter entirely :grinning:)

My pup currently likes to eat his dinner standing half in and half out the conservatory…if he leaves it for a few minutes there is a small brown cat that will risk life and limb by creeping under the fence just to snatch a few mouthfuls of raw chicken mince…(or tripe or whatever)

The waste coming out the other end of raw fed dogs is minimal and naturally bio degrades far quicker…

All to say that I don’t know what the answer is but just thought I would mention in passing (no pun intended :grinning:) the lesser effects of raw fed animals on the environment…:slightly_smiling_face:

Really? Is that true? I did raw feed my 3 dogs for a time some years ago and didn’t notice the effect you describe, but I wasn’t looking for it though. I only stopped it because it was too much trouble cutting, weighing, bagging and freezing the bulk amounts I was given for them.

I never saw any difference on our German Shepherds in the 1 1/2 years we fed them raw meat and they were very active.

We are Mr and Mrs. Scrooge. We too use heating pellets and then the pellets minus poo go in cardboard boxes of which we have oodles from pizza carton to Amazon box and then on the robust wood burner. We’ve done this for decades, my old Rayburn was very happy as is my new La Nordica. Dog waste goes double wrapped in the bin. Always has. Guinea pig waste goes on the rhubarb. As vegans their waste is not offensive.

I really notice it if I give them something that isn’t raw or treats that aren’t just freeze dried or air dried…but like you I always pick up after them and double bag…very occasionally I miss one for a few days and it has very obviously dried out and is almost dust…i figure if I left it longer then it would disappear but I’ve always been one to pick up after them and it’s hard to stop doing that…

Years ago I read work wonders by the Australian vet Tom Lonsdale and switched to a raw diet for them overnight…

His website is www.rawmeatybones.com

But I notice the same Helen, and my dogs for a long time have been fed on either tinned sardines or cooked chicken haunches + croquettes . This was started because my last dog, Tosca, had liver problems and was advised no red meat by the vet.

I think the drying to nothing is a natural thing whatever they are fed, but as since the end of 2019 when my long distance travel came to an end and I am home every night, missed deposits are an extreme rarity nowadays.