Sanglier in our field

Pretty certain we’ve been visited by a family of wild pig in the last few days. Lovely idea, but in practice they’re doing a fair amount of damage and we’ve planted a lot of young trees this autumn that I fear for.
Does anyone know, having “found” us, are they likely to keep coming back?
And if so, can anyone suggest a benign deterrent please? (I realise this is a pretty daft question, even so, thought it might be worth asking)
Also, are they dawn / dusk feeders? Or they out in the dead of night? (Just trying to manage keeping pigs and dogs apart.)

Dusk and dawn are when they move most, and yes they develop routes.
The only effective deterrent we’ve found is an electric fence, three strands with the lower one at snuffling piggy nose height.

Alternative is to talk to the local chasse…

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Could be a benefit… they might be sniffing out truffes :wink:
You seen the prices they fetch!

We had them for 1 night 9nly but agree quite destructive. They soon moved on.

Thanks everyone. I hope you’re right @Mat_Davies and they move on - we’re surrounded by woods and farmland. Here’s hoping our bio worms aren’t a special delicacy for them!
If they do come back I was thinking electric fence thanks for the suggestion @JJones - fortunately their approach to our field is very specific - so a loop of electric fence across the bottom of our field would be viable. (I tolerate the hunters but not so keen on encouraging them!)
@Graham_Lees Truffles??? Sadly I doubt it.

They can be out in the dead of night too.
I have seen film of them in The forest of Dean, little eyes in the dark.

I’ve an English friend in the Drôme who has a prolific truffle oak in his garden, but his truffle snaffling problem isn’t les sangliers, it’s ses voisins!

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OMG that is terrible! I’d be putting out solar motion detecting lights and a game cam or whatever they are called!

Did a wonderful sunny walk in the hills of the Cantal this afternoon with a friend who got a game cam for Christmas - but he said the only life it’s captured so far is the farmer next door!

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I had those when I lived in South Africa because I was on the edge of town with indigenous veldt on three sides and without any walls topped by razor wire and three strands of electric wire (which is the norm in many places).

So every time in the night that a wild tortoise or a leguan (large 2m monitor lizard) went through the garden all the lights would come on and I’d restart the mental debate about having a gun or converting the master bedroom into a panic room - already had burglar bars on all the windows, so just needed an electric gate in the hall.

It’s hard to live like that if you’re not used to it

In the UK these are nature cameras…here they are piège appareil or caméra de chasse. :confused::upside_down_face:

Must be so wonderful to live here after having to endure that…I sometimes wonder during the night if I have locked the front door, but turn over and go back to sleep. :slight_smile:

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We have a walnut tree which although when we leave each year has many walnuts but for the last 2 years, when our friend goes to harvest, them not one is left on the ground. Could it really be squirrels?

O yes, we have 2 very large walnut trees one of them a black walnut, we end up in a constant battle with them to get the walnuts from them.

I have had them sitting on top of the 8ft wall at the side of the drive shouting abuse at us and dropping/throwing figs at us :grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes: one of them was really unhappy last year as after 10 min of abuse I knocked him off the wall with a well placed apple.

Unfortunately they will keep coming back, they make some mess and are pretty persistent. They generally appear during the night in our case we have seen them on the CCTV. We fenced off a part of the garden that was open but they bulldozed their way in, the only solution that we found that has worked is an electric fence or build a wall. Also are they are quite good at jumping!

Or rats. We have no squirrels but we are keeping our rat population well fed.