What’s your favourite expression?

sayings

(Jane Jones) #41

Espagnole… I think your predictive text/spell check is in another country.

(And be careful where you use that expression, it originates from a racist anti-basque phrase)


(Terry Williams) #42

There was a spokesman at the European Commission who rarely spoke a sentence which didn’t include at least one “donc”. To the point that we hacks spent more time counting how many times he’d said it than paying attention to what he was telling us.


(Peter Goble) #43

I’m just been smitten coup de foudre having spotted “une chasuble fluo” in a thread on something elsewhere that was a bit of a yawn (IMHO).

My mind is in a giddy spin. Chasuble fluo is my mad fling for the weekend in the woods! :heart::hugs::stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:


(Véronique Langlands) #44

Using donc as a filler, especially at the start of a sentence, is the sign of an idiot.


(Carol Bouvet) #45

I used to hear a lot of" ah bas dis donc"(a sort of statement of amazement or incredulity) from my inlaws family often accompanied by that particular noise when you shake your wrist putting thumb and second finger together letting the first finger fall on to it,it used to really amuse me when I saw my husbands 8 year old nephew doing this.He is now over 40.
Do people still say this or was it just a regional thing(they were from La Sarthe)


(Giles Gilb Langley) #46

I think it’s a thing from northern France


(Ian Loughlin) #47

“I have a cunning plan.”


(Véronique Langlands) #48

In English I tend to use a lot of words beginning with B. I shall avoid besmirching the site with them.


(James Higginson) #49

Brilliant!


(Nellie Moss ) #50

Bedazzling

I had a cat once who was a naughty when a kitten. I realised one day he thought his name was Little F@@@er


(Tim O'Connor 2) #51

“What did I come in here for?”

Worse still, standing half way up the stairs thinking “was I going up or down?”

And in the back of my head… “Enjoy yourself, it’s later than you think!”


(Mary Wolcott) #52

My two favorite (silly) sayings - or, since they lack philosophical pith are probably more like expressions, picked up from when I lived in the Southwest US (Texas):

“Tighter than a tick” - means one is in the state of having had a tasty meal and eaten one’s fill. Probably followed by a belch and/or a sigh of delighted sated bliss…

“It don’t make me no nevermind, honey” - means one has no preference; it doesn’t matter either way. I love this one just because it kind of rolls off of my tongue. But I don’t say it in polite company, just usually out of hearing by anyone else. :sunny:


(Peter Goble) #53

An interesting saying. Like its English counterpart “Whatever/whadevver” it can be used to mean absolute and careless indifference of a wholly negative kind ("You don’t register anywhere in my affections’) or an unquestioningly positive allegiance to anything you propose or intend (“I’m completely under your spell, you can do no wrong”).

Both are very tricky, I think.


(Mary Wolcott) #54

Peter, I do agree. I’m thinking that the tricky part is the inflection. And if you say it ‘Whatevah’ or ‘What-EV-ah’ then it’s even more hoity-toity and superfluous and flip and so forth… :sunny:


(Helen Wright) #55

A totally irreverent take on “I’m not bovvered…whateva…” x :smiley:


(Mary Wolcott) #56

“un de ces quatre” which means ‘one of these days’, or ‘sometime soon’ or ‘at some point’ (from The Local, an online news website thelocal.fr, which has been posting articles on french expressions)

This expression is a shortened version of a 19th century saying un de ces quatre matins (one of these four mornings’) In this case, the mornings refer to the future and the number four symbolises a short but imprecise amount of time. The Local wrote that one of the reasons this expression is so handy is because the amount of time it implies, although in the near future, is not specified. So you could use it to talk about a future plan that you don’t have an exact date for, such as, Je devrais appeler ma tante un de ces quatre . (I should call my aunt at some point)

You can also use it as a way to make a casual invitation to see if someone wants to get together, such as, On va aller boire un verre un de ces quatres . (We are going to go for a drink sometime soon)

Or you could use it to say goodbye to someone that you don’t know when exactly you’ll see again.

Adding à to the beginning of this expression turns it into a casual way to ‘say see you around’ or ‘see you some day soon’, for example Salut, à un de ces quatre! (Bye, see you around!)

This expression is mostly used in spoken French, although you may see à un de ces quatre written phonetically as a12c4 in text messages.


(Hilary Jane Dunk) #57

Found it…Mickey 3d apparently…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSVfWBM3hR0

Quite catchy, I have yet to decipher the words…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mickey_3D


(Peter Goble) #58

Great stuff, Mary. Any more astuces? :blush::+1:


(Mary Wolcott) #59

Thanks! Wow, great french word, ‘astuces’. Never heard of that one, so I looked it up, and found a website I’d never been to before that looks fabulous…?

https://www.astuces-pratiques.fr/

Cheers :smile:


(Ann Coe) #60

Made me laugh, lots ! …

C’est pas grave
C’est pas grave que Ribery soit pas joli,
c’est pas grave que Benzema soit mal poli,
c’est pas grave même si c’est la faute à Nasri,
C’est pas grave
c’est pas grave si Valbuena fait du chiqué
c’est pas grave si Giroud tire à côté,
c’est pas grave Loris est là pour nous sauver
C’est pas grave

allez si vous gagnez les bleu
tout ira beaucoup mieux
mais personne vous dira, des saloperie comme ça
vous aurez vos statuts
peut être même une rue
portera votre nom

c’est pas grave
c’est pas grave si fait penalty
c’est pas grave sur une erreur de Debuchy
c’est pas grave même si c’est la faute a Nasri
c’est pas grave
c’est pas grave si tu peux pas saquer Sako
c’est pas grave t’irais faire la fête a Rio
c’est pas grave mais tu vas fini a Sochaux
c’est pas grave

allez si vous gagnez les bleu
tout ira beaucoup mieux
la France viendra danser sur les champs elysée

tout le monde sera content
surtout le président
on lui foutera la paix

aller c’est pas grave
c’est pas grave même si Abidal est cramé
c’est pas grave même si Evra est fatigué
c’est pas grave il y aura qu’a bailler Matuidi
c’est pas grave Mavuba viendra les aider

allez si vous gagnez les bleu
tout ira beaucoup mieux
mais personne vous dira, des saloperie comme ça
vous aurez vos statuts
peut être même une rue
portera votre nom

allez si vous gagnez les bleu
tout ira beaucoup mieux
la France viendra danser sur les Champs Élysée

tout le monde sera content

surtout le président

on lui foutera la paix

au moins pour cet été