French road marking


(Richard Paul-Jones) #1

Anyone know if the lane divider with the staggered lines (in the attached image) has any significance? It seems to appear on small country roads but does not seem to be related to any particular hazard or indicate any desired behaviour (such as no overtaking, slow down for cyclists or Danger! frogs crossing).


(Richard Paul-Jones) #2

Sorted. Thanks Andy.


(Mike Kearney) #3

Each lane has been laid separately, so there is a join down the middle. Those are the staples that stop it from coming apart.


(Andy Carter) #4

These markings are called "Marquage Axiale de Guidage" and are defined in this document: http://www.cotita.fr/IMG/pdf_3-Marquage_voie_etroite.pdf

Everybody is right that they are there simply when there is no room for two proper lanes of 2.5 metres each side...


(Terry Williams) #5

I asked a gendarme (one of the motorbike highway patrol whose HQ is at the bottom of our road) about these markings and he said much as Bernadette. They're just an indication of where the middle of the road is when it's too narrow for two regular lanes.


(Melissa Miller) #6

I used to despair at the lack of cats eyes in France but I have noticed that they are beginning to use a similar technique on the major roads - I do not think they are cats eyes (they seem more like bits of reflective glass) which were invented by Percy Shaw who, of course, was English - which explains why France is so reluctant to use them!! Perhaps they have "invented" their own now!!

"Percy Shaw even made them to cleanse themselves with the help of a little rain-water – the cast iron base collected the rain water and whenever a vehicle ran over the top of the Cats Eye, the weight pushed the dome down and then the rainwater would automatically wash the glass beads keeping them clean and motorists safe. Shaw’s company Reflecting Roadstuds at its peak made over one million Cats Eyes a year and exported them across the globe." - Simon McBride


(Melissa Miller) #7

I think they are just saving on paint by doing a diddy line, but create work by going up one side then down the other. The line indicates that you should try and keep to your side of the road just in case that elusive car appears (not often in deepest France) which has a right to drive on the other side of the road.


(jo anne morris bingham) #8

Richard - would you allow me to copy and past your description and the photo of the line-pushing tree sloth? I promise to give you credit for it. Thankx


(Allison Feeley) #9

But when something works well and reduces road deaths, would'nt it be sensible to adopt another country's methods!


(Kate O'Reilly) #10

Because you are in France, not England. Don’t compare everything that’s different, and assume that the Uk is better. This is the France!


(Peter Bird) #11

How many other European/World countries use cats eyes ? I can't recall seeing many around in my travels outside of the UK.


(Helen O'BRIEN) #12

We totally agree! My hubby used to commute back and forth from Toulouse to the Dordogne late at night and before dawn, a 2.5hr trip every Monday and Friday. On a wet road the lane markings are impossible to see so his motorway run and the main roads outside Cahors were lethal, Nevermind the windy road linking Cahors with Villefranche du Périgord.


(Simon Roxburgh) #13

ain't it true.


(Robert Scotton) #14

you must have read my mind Simon....lol


(Allison Feeley) #15

Somehow I knew you were going to say that!


(Simon Roxburgh) #16

won't use cats eyes because they weren't invented in france.


(Allison Feeley) #17

While we are on the subject of road markings, why oh why do the French not use cats eyes here (particularly on the motorway)? Is it just me,but those stupid green plastic markers with a white arrow (that resemble a dustbin) but are really there to show you that you have just missed your exit are rubbish! If they adopted a cats eyes colour code like UK motorways (green to mark an exit, white in the centre of the road etc…)I wouldn’t keep sailing past the exits in the dark and have to go to the next one creeping the last 500m as well as pay an extra junction on the peage!


(Crosbie Fitch) #18

Yes, that's the meaning I've always understood, that they signify overlapping lanes (of a road slightly narrower than standard), and cars must pass each other with care.


(Melanie Whitehead) #19

None taken! Until you called me duck;o) I hate being called duck lol


(Peter Bird) #20

Sorry Duck, no offence intended !