Letter of intent for carte de sejour

Hi could anybody help me get a copy of letter of intent for getting a carte de sejour thank you in advance

You can probably download a form from the government site, service-public.fr and searching for ‘carte de séjour’.

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Out of curiosity, what is a “letter of intent” in this context?

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Any new, online process may just be a form that can be completed on line or downloaded and filled in. So it might possibly be that you wont need one.

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I’m thinking of two possible “letters of intent”…
I think everyone is asked to supply a list of personal details, information relevant to the application, and it may be the case that there is a very good/very poor way to do this. There is no precise list of required details, only some that must not be left out. Has anyone got the perfect template?
Second thought is …the information on one of the legal sites, about getting a letter written or endorsed? by a European rights lawyer, to describe in detail, your best attributes/reasons/" justicatifs"? For why you might be considered as a possible, special case, with the right to remain, inspite of any judgement made against your application, in the first instance, by the prefecture.
That letter would then be submitted to the Minister for the Interior, Ministre de l’Interieur , as a kind of appeal against the negative judgement. Typically, might be someone elderly, judged to be a likely drain on the economy, having no home of their own, in France, and inadequate resources. I read about that, on my own behalf, but have no reason, so far to make use of it.

I expect I’m being dim but I still can’t see how a letter of intent fits into the cds application process. It’s simply a box ticking exercise to prove faits accomplis isn’t it?
For an appeal, maybe - but then you would write your own personal statement.
I am just wondering if the op has asked the right question. What’s the French name for the document you’re looking for, David?

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Perhaps the prefets do it, each in their own way?
If its all online, now, I haven’t seen that application…the first letter they sent me had instructions… (Not for an appeal against a refusal).

“EXPLIQUEZ VOTRE SITUATION en quelques lignes.
Vous devez également préciser dans l’objet de votre mail la raison de votre demande (exemple salarié, conjoint de français, admission exceptionnelle au séjour…)”

PS…for an appeal, the advice I read, ‘human rights’, legal advice…, was to get legal help, with that statement. To make sure you presented your best case. I asked who to refer to specifically, if it was necessary, and was sent a list of free, Human Rights lawyers, in my region.

I should think it is just a polite cover letter of the sort mthat one usually writes to accompany and expand on the bare facts set out in an official form with limited space and certainly no room for nuance.

“Monsieur/Madame …[contents]… veuillez cher monsieur, chère madame, agréer l’expression de mes sentiments distingués” or whatever.

I remember learning how to address a theoretical missive to a minister of religion who held a military rank and was also the younger son of a peer when I was little, so useful.

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Could be insignificant, but never waste an opportunity, to present a best case, is my own feeling… :slight_smile:

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I’m the polar opposite! I firmly believe in letting the documents speak for themselves. I think trying to give explanations nobody has asked for, risks muddying the waters, and the lower key you can keep it all, the better imho.

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That’s the point of asking the human rights lawyer to chip in. They will know precisely, how to avoid muddying the waters, with irrelevant information. Hopefully!

I vaguely remember a lady SFNer that posted some help regarding this topic.
A template/suggestion was mentioned.
For some reason Sandy Hewlet comes to mind, apologies if I am mistaken, but I cannot find anything in the search box :face_with_hand_over_mouth::thinking:

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Hello David - Perhaps you could give us a little more information about your personal circumstances - e.g. Your Nationality , how long you have been a permanent resident in France, employed or retired and who requested a Letter of Intent. Then l’m sure that the well informed and reliable members on the Forum will point you in exactly the right direction in your quest to obtain a carte de sejour.

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Seems like a sledgehammer to crack a nut, to me, but chacun son truc.

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Personally, I would imagine that any member of staff in the prefecture who got so much as a whiff of the mention of human rights lawyers, would be on the defensive from the get go!

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Well, :grin:…that may well be, but our gentleman, here on SF, for whom we pool our wisdom in the matter, shares neither your confidence, nor Anna’s, I think, at present.

Plus, I know when thinking about those required few lines, I had absolutely zip idea, what would be most acceptable to the City Prefet. And toute seule, would have guessed quite wrongly.
I didn’t ask a lawyer then, but someone chipped in with sound advice, that ought to have been perfect, but wasn’t, because of a Prefet error…in…any…case…!
So for me and perhaps David, (not knowing which prefet for him)…my guess is that an H. Rights lawyer, just down the street, from the soldiers and cops on guard, a bit of local advice would have gone down very well!

He’s gone very quiet, maybe bored by my chatter, given up on the whole idea, and taken a camel to Thailand, instead…:joy:?

You found the replies from the euro legal rights dept, useful, I think, Cat? That’s where all my investigations began, they seem knowledgeable, kind and wise, to me. I guess the prefets must be used to hr lawyer contact by now. :slight_smile:…how do you spell…knowledgeable…ah…gottit…

The problem with human rights lawyers and people moving etc within western Europe is that there isn’t anywhere really in western Europe that systematically abuses the human rights of European citizens, so a UK citizen having to go home to the UK because the UK government chooses to put itself outside the club isn’t really having their human rights infringed but suffering from personal inconvenience as a consequence of a democratically sanctioned process in their country of origin.

You can’t compare it to someone from any one of a number of hell-holes around the globe seeking asylum in the EU. That’s what I meant by a sledgehammer to crack a nut. There’s a difference between human rights and what international treaties allow you to do.

I think the préfecture just applies legislation in the light of the information it has, so a cover letter while nice isn’t essential, and a human rights lawyer even less so.

(I wouldn’t be allowed to work in the US if I went there right now, is that an infringement of my human rights?)

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Well for our CdS we had a folder of all the required bits of paper with a list of them at the front. The official at prefecture took list, and ticked off the items one by one as he went through folder. And that was it. No letter, no nothing. The only letter in the folder was the attestation sur l’honneur far date of residence that I’d used many years before when first registering with CPAM.

All of the prefectures are a little different, so you have to go on what yours requires. But to me a letter of intent is merely stating that you are applying for temporary/permanent CdS on the grounds of having lived here for x years…

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Maybe I have the wrong idea of what a “letter of intent” is. I understand it to be a formal document you submit when you open negotiations. Applying for a cds isn’t a negotiation, it is a box ticking exercise as Jane says.

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