Worming a cat

The reason I use the spot on is I had two brothers Eric and Ernie who would shred your arms if you tried to give them tablets, my vet of 30 years told me to man up and be firm with them, I let him try with them and hearing quite a lot of swearing he came out and gave me the spot on treatment after telling me it was not often he was defeated but he valued his face and arms :laughing::grin:
Hence why I take the easy option with all the rest, snip off the top and 2 seconds to squirt between the shoulder blades, I can do all nine in 10 min.

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I’m sure you meant deworming :face_with_hand_over_mouth:

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@Dee_DeTolkTW What you posted is dangerous. My laughing fit turned into a violent coughing bout which very nearly expelled all the air in my lungs.

I love all animals, but am so glad that I am a dog, rather than cat, person. :laughing:

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The “wrap in a towel lie it on its back massage throat technique” worked ok for the first 3 days of the 10 day morning -and-night regime prescribed by the doc. By day 4, the cat was becoming very angry and also learning to swallow while keeping the tablet in his cheek for spitting out afterwards. By day 5 it became completely impossible so we took to crushing the tablets into a very fine powder with the back of a spoon and mixing with a small amount of wet food (as an aperitif). He didn’t get the rest of the food until he’d eaten that. It worked for long enough. On the basis that losing a day of the already-tailing-off steroids was probably ok, we called it a success. We have agreed that in future, the vet gives him the pills :smiley:

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Back in the day, (in UK) we had a tube of worming cream. Put a splodge on the cats nose and it licked it off. Worked like a treat, literally (I’ve still got a 15cm scar on my forearm from trying to worm/deworm a cat with tablets 40 years ago).

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Cats can be tricky:

Thank you for this; I have a copy of it somewhere on a memory stick, but damned if I could find it. I no longer have a cat, but so enjoyed reading this again!

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Sorry if I have posted before.
I love these animation’s, this is the earliest one I could find.

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Don’t try a tablet or anything the cat might have to put in it’s mouth. Life is too short and your skin too fragile. Use the spot on. I used it for my two this spring and it’s much easier. Or. My mother uses an injection given by the vet which should last for six months and is supposed to protect against worms tics fleas and everything else.

My vet doesn’t seem to offer this but maybe yours would ?

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Thank you so much for posting this! Just finished reading it sitting on my own in a cafe. I’ve been shaking with laughter tears rolling down my cheeks. Other customers obviously think I’m deranged but it was worth it

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I love those Simon’s Cat things!

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I don’t know if it’s available for worming, but one of our cats is a very devil for any kind of medication; he’s eaten his way all around a pill when we hid it in his cat food, leaving the ‘island’ isolated. Trying to put anything in his mouth is close to suicidal. So when he had an infection recently the vet gave us an ‘easypill confort urinaire’ which includes various good stuff in a fairly soft and chewy little ball. He’s been eating those very happily, though sometimes he does feel he has to ‘kill’ them first.

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I usually use a spot-on treatment, but lately I’ve just been using a pill. He’s not keen, but he doesn’t bear a grudge.

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If you’re going to try giving the pill down the cat’s throat smother the pill and your fingers in butter which helps it go down. That worked a treat with my 3 hand reared kittens back in the day. Having said that, my current super nervy little cat goes to the vet as I’m afraid of the damage that would ensue if I tried it. To me, not her…

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One of my cats will eat the worming pill out of my hand, like a treat. I so wish all cats were as easy as she is!

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Seriously though…cats are notoriously anti medication aren’t they no matter how well meaning our intentions are…:grinning:

Food grade diatomaceous earth sprinkled daily on food may help …??? It’s natural tasteless and well tolerated…it does take about a month or so and then you could maybe send off for a worm count to see what if anything is still lurking …???

I use it for my collies plus a capful of apple cider vinegar (with the mother) in drinking water…

I find Slippery elm is also really soothing on the digestive tract…

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The wildcat I am friends with could probably do with worming. But she’s feeding kittens.

Is there anything that’s safe and works for mothers still feeding? I have some diatomic earth tablets left over from when I had an in-house pet. But they did not seem to work and I had to use a much stronger pill made by Bayer. That seemed to be stunningly effective but I am very doubtful about it passing through to any kittens via mother’s milk.

Kittens need wormed at 4-5 weeks as they are usually born with infected with worms anyway, ours are 11weeks now and just had their first vaccinations and the vet wormed them again for us.

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I’m always super cautious about things like that too…which chemicals cross from the placenta to developing foetus and which chemicals are capable of passing from mother to babies through breast milk…??? .( in Border Collies there are specific contraindicated chemical wormers which should never be prescribed for them and years ago and trusting my vet at the time I found out the hard way just how much devastation can be caused by inappropriate veterinary prescribing :slightly_frowning_face:)

On the natural front there’s ground pumpkin seeds and coconut oil/shredded coconut and grated raw carrot and garlic and herbs and quite a few natural ways of dealing with worms including a species appropriate raw diet but over the years I have tended to stick with the species appropriate raw diet and food grade diatomaceous earth (full of micronutrients too) and apple cider vinegar…and with cats it’s always a case of what will they actually take :grinning:

One of my daughters has a raw fed unvaccinated naturally reared cat who has 4 kittens at the minute…they are forward and healthy and chunky and full of beans and one kitten is going to my other daughter who will continue to naturally rear him…

Thanks @Helen6 . For now, it sounds like crushing the diatom tablets and trying to work out which food will conceal them best would be the first thing to try. I’m pretty sure she won’t eat anything obviously vegetarian.
There are ground pumpkin seeds and some other seeds in the tablets. Might give the idea of coconut oil some thought though - could be like castor oil in humans. As you say, it’ll be a question of what she won’t eat.

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